Tag Archives: Lent

The Raising of Lazarus: Life Out of Death

By the Rev. Darren Miner

Gospel reading

Today we hear about God’s power over death in the story of the raising of Lazarus. Think of today’s Gospel reading as a foretaste of Easter, a preview of something greater still.

Jesus is in a town called Bethany across the Jordan, when a messenger arrives from a town in Judea, also named Bethany. The messenger is sent from his friends Mary and Martha, asking him to come heal their brother Lazarus, who is seriously ill. Now, unbeknownst to all but Jesus, Lazarus is already dead. Considering the distance between the two Bethanies, it turns out that Lazarus must have died the same day the messenger was sent. Perhaps this explains why Jesus was in no great hurry to head out.

Now, in what is one heck of a prophetic double entendre, Jesus explains that “this illness does not lead to death; rather it is for God’s glory, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.” The double meaning lies in the phrase “that the Son of God may be glorified.” On the one hand, it can simply mean that Jesus will receive honor. On the other hand, it can mean that he will be crucified; for throughout John’s Gospel, glorification is a code word for Jesus’ crucifixion. And indeed, later we’re told that the chief priests plot to kill Jesus precisely because of the stir he caused by raising Lazarus.

By the time Jesus and his entourage arrive at Bethany in Judea, Lazarus has been dead four days. This is significant, because according to popular Jewish belief, the soul stayed in the vicinity of the body for three days and then departed to its final destination. So, after four days, the expectation would be that the soul was irretrievable. Martha approaches Jesus and gently reprimands him for his late arrival. Even so, she declares her continuing belief in Jesus as the Messiah. Jesus’ response is the poignant and profound statement that we hear proclaimed at just about every Christian burial: “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live.”

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The Disruption of Lent

By the Rev. Darren Miner

Lectionary Readings

Today is the first Sunday in Lent, a period of forty days of self-examination and self-discipline in preparation for Easter. The coming of Lent always seems a bit jarring, a time of disorientation and discontinuity. And this discontinuity is reflected in the lectionary itself. For today’s Gospel reading takes place a full eight chapters before last Sunday’s Gospel reading, which featured the Transfiguration of Christ on a mountaintop.

And this disorientation and discontinuity is reflected in our parish life, as well. Fr. David is away from us, recovering from a stroke. And we have to do the best we can to keep on keeping on without our leader. We are experimenting with combining the English- and Cantonese-speaking congregations for joint worship, and we don’t know yet how well this will work out. And finally, there is the fact that the Chinese New Year, a time of family celebration throughout much of Asia, falls right during the first two weeks of Lent, a time the Church has ordained for quiet reflection and repentance. This year, the discontinuity and disruption of Lent just cannot be ignored.

Now, we’re told that Lent is supposed to be a quiet time, a slow time, but this is surely not reflected in the Gospel reading from Mark. Mark rushes us through three important scenes in Jesus’ life in only seven verses.

380px-Baptism-of-Christ-xx-Francesco-AlbanFirst, Jesus is baptized by John the Baptist in the river Jordan. Jesus sees the heavens torn apart and the Holy Spirit descend into him. (Notice that I said, “into” not “on.” That’s what the Greek text literally says.) And Jesus hears the voice of his heavenly Father acknowledge him. Unlike other Evangelists, Mark does not mention whether others saw and heard what Jesus saw and heard. In Mark’s hurried account, the descent of the Spirit and the acknowledgement of God the Father seem to be meant only for Jesus, a sign that now is the time to start something new. Jesus is empowered by the Spirit, but even so, he is not immediately sent out to begin his ministry in the world.

640px-Brooklyn_Museum_-_Jesus_Tempted_in_the_Wilderness_(Jésus_tenté_dans_le_désert)_-_James_Tissot_-_overallInstead, he is cast out into the wilderness to undergo forty days of trial and temptation. Here again, Mark hurries through this episode in Jesus’ life. Matthew and Luke go into great detail about each of the temptations of the Christ. Mark couldn’t care less. He has no time for that. The forty days flash by in a single sentence, and we proceed immediately to the ministry of Christ in the world, to his proclamation of the Kingdom of God.

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2015 Lenten Study starts on Feb 27

The annual Lenten Study will be held on five consecutive Fridays in Lent, February 27–March 27, at 6:30 p.m. We will be reading Fr. Christopher Webber’s book ‘A Time to Turn: Anglican Readings for Lent and Easter Week,’ as part of the lenten series. In Fr. David’s absence, contact Fr. Darren to get the textbook; the requested donation for the textbook is $10.35.

The first and last sessions will be followed by a Lenten version of our monthly Taizé Healing Service. The plan is for participants to have completed a brief reading assignment before each meeting, including the first. Here are the assignments for the course:

  • February 27: Discuss “Introduction,” “Ash Wednesday,” and “First Week of Lent,” pp. vii-ix, 1-2, 9-24.
  • March 6: Discuss “Second Week of Lent,” pp. 25-40.
  • March 13: Discuss “Third Week of Lent,” pp. 41-58.
  • March 20: Discuss “Fourth Week of Lent,” pp. 59-74.
  • March 27: Discuss “Fifth Week of Lent,” pp. 75-90.

Brief biographies of the authors may be found on pp. 123-28. And of course, you are encouraged to read the remaining chapters not covered in the Lenten Study! Please sign up on the sign-up sheet in the narthex.

LentenStudy

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Turning to the Light

A sermon preached by the Rev. Dr. Christopher L. Webber on March 30, 2014, at the Church of the Incarnation, San Francisco.

A friend of mine who lives down toward West Portal has recently written a book titled: The Election of 1864: Our Greatest Victory. And people have been puzzled by the title. Completely baffled. The election of 1864? Who was running? What difference did it make? How could it be “Our Greatest Victory”?

Well, I’m sure you all know that the Democrats that year nominated George McClellan, General George McClellan, and the Republicans nominated – wait, wait, don’t tell me – right, Abraham Lincoln. And the prospects for his election were not good. So on August 23, 1864, Lincoln wrote a memo to his Cabinet anticipating that he would lose the election. The war had been going on too long and people were tired of it. It was time to make peace; let the South go. Lincoln’s wisest advisors told him he was certain to lose.

So Lincoln wrote a secret memo sealed until after the election, saying that if he lost as expected, he would cooperate with the winning candidate to preserve the union until the new president was inaugurated, but after that the Union would certainly be dissolved. Of course, if that had happened, we would have had two countries, and slavery would have continued indefinitely. Can you imagine? Still slaves in Texas and the southern states? But if the South had gone its own way, what would have changed it? And more than that, if the country had become divided, there would have been no powerful American armies to win the First World War or the Second. Can you imagine that world? We would be living in a different world entirely.

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January 2014 Issue of the Word – a quarterly newsletter from Incarnation

The January 2014 Edition of our quarterly newsletter, The Word, is now online! You can catch up on what’s been happening at Incarnation and what’s coming up! Read it here https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5BjXKwS7KTyejMyMmxvNnc3Q2c/edit?usp=sharing

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The Last Temptation of Christ, the Lasting Temptation of Christians

By the Rev. Darren Miner

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Today is the first Sunday in Lent, a period of forty days of self-examination and self-discipline in preparation for Easter. The coming of Lent always seems a bit jarring, a time of disorientation and discontinuity. And this discontinuity is reflected in the lectionary. For today’s Gospel reading about the temptation of Christ in the wilderness takes place a full thirteen chapters before last Sunday’s Gospel reading, which featured the Transfiguration of Christ on a mountaintop. Just to reorient you, let me remind you what takes place just before Jesus’ temptation. Jesus has been baptized in the Jordan River by John the Baptist, and the Holy Spirit has descended upon him. Then, a voice from heaven proclaims, “This is my Son, the Beloved; with whom I am well pleased.” You might think that Jesus would now go forth and proclaim the Good News. But instead, before beginning his public ministry, he undergoes a time of testing. It’s at this point that today’s story begins

Temptation_of_ChristAnd it begins on a rather odd note, with the Holy Spirit leading Jesus into the wilderness for the express purpose of being tested by the Devil. I say “leads” because that’s the word Matthew uses; in Mark’s Gospel, we’re told that the Spirit “casts him out” into the wilderness. In any case, one thing is clear: the whole episode takes place at God’s behest, not the Devil’s. We’re never told why, but I have some ideas on the subject. I suspect that this time of testing was necessary for Jesus to work out for himself just what kind of Messiah he was going to be, to figure out what kind of Kingdom he was going to proclaim—and to come to terms with the possible consequences of those decisions, such as death on a Roman cross.

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Lenten Meditation

A beautiful visual meditation on Jesus’ 40 days in the wilderness with illustrations by Simon Smith. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-6a25Yo2wE. For this and other Lenten resources visit our pinterest page http://www.pinterest.com/incarnationsf/lent-2014/

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Lent 2014 at Incarnation

LentServices-page-001We will be meeting on five Fridays in Lent to participate in a diocesan program, “ProClaim Engaging the Baptismal Covenant”,  focusing on the baptismal covenant and the role of personal storytelling in spreading the Gospel.

Dates: The sessions will start on March 14 and conclude on April 11.

Time: Each session will begin at 6:30 p.m. and end by 7:45 p.m.

Location: The Episcopal Church of the Incarnation, 1750 29th Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94122.

Please try to attend as many sessions as you can!

On Sundays during Lent we will be focusing our anthems on different compositions by composers on the ‘Ave Verum Corpus’ text. For more details visit http://musicatincarnationsf.wordpress.com/

For additional information visit http://www.incarnationsf.org. For additional Lenten resources visit our pinterest page http://www.pinterest.com/incarnationsf/lent-2014/

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