Tag Archives: easter

Conversion, Commission, Communion

By the Rev. Darren Miner

Lectionary Readings

In the early church, sermons given during Eastertide were mystagogical. That is to say, they were designed to lead the newly baptized deeper into the mystery of our faith. Typically, they dealt with the two great sacraments of Baptism and Eucharist. Well, this sermon won’t be a lesson primarily about the sacraments, but I hope that it does lead you further into the mystery of our faith.

In todays’ readings, we hear about two spiritual giants: St. Paul and St. Peter. First, we hear the story of the conversion of St. Paul, when he encounters the Risen Lord on the road to Damascus. It is one of three accounts of Paul’s conversion found in the Acts of the Apostles, an indication of the story’s importance to the early church. In the Gospel reading from John, we get a strange story about Peter and his companions breakfasting with the Risen Christ on a beach, followed by an equally strange conversation between Jesus and Peter.

St. Paul, formerly known as Saul of Tarsus, started out his career as a righteous (one might even say self-righteous) Pharisee and a self-appointed vigilante. He took it upon himself to go from town to town and root out Christians from the local synagogues. And to his great shame later in life, Paul participated, albeit peripherally, in the lynching of St. Stephen the Protomartyr.

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Easter Service, Sun. March 27 at 10 a.m.

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Easter Service: Sun. March 27, 10 a.m.
Incarnation Episcopal Church, 1750 29th Avenue, San Francisco

Easter Day is the greatest feast of the Christian Year. This is a time of great celebration as we rejoice in our redemption. Join us in the joyous celebration. The service includes special music followed by a festive reception.

For more information visit www.incarnationsf.org or call (415) 564-2324

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Yes, it’s still Easter! And yes, your sins are forgiven!

By the Rev. Darren Miner

Lectionary Readings

Today is the third Sunday of Easter, and yes, it’s still Easter. It will continue to be Easter till we reach the feast of Pentecost on May 24th. There are various ways that we mark this joyous season. We use festive vestments of white. We read the Acts of the Apostles in place of the Hebrew scriptures. We include extra Alleluias. And finally, the Confession is optionally omitted. During this season, we pause for 50 days to experience the Day of Resurrection and to consider its consequences for us as disciples of Jesus. It’s kind of like the movie Groundhog Day, in which Bill Murray’s character experiences the same day over and over again till he learns his lesson.

But this seasonal focus on one point in time, the Day of Resurrection, is belied somewhat by today’s first two readings. The first reading from Acts takes place some months later, after Pentecost, and mentions the Resurrection only in passing. And the second reading from First John takes place about 70 years after the Resurrection of Jesus and doesn’t mention the Resurrection at all. Only the Gospel reading actually takes place on that first Easter Sunday. Despite these disparities, all three readings do share common threads. So after a quick review of each of the readings, I’ll attempt to tease out two of those common threads.

Let’s start with the Gospel reading. This account from Luke tells his version of the appearance of the Risen Lord to the disciples. It is basically the same story we heard last week, but with some differences in detail. For example, Luke spares Thomas the embarrassment of being the only doubting disciple. In today’s account, all the disciples display doubt at Jesus’ appearance in their midst. And Jesus invites them all to touch him, so as to verify that he is not a ghost. Then, as the final proof of his physicality, he asks for some food. Now as both a vegetarian and a preacher, I devoutly wish that the disciples had given him a loaf of bread. But what they gave him was a piece of broiled fish. Now, if he had shared bread with them, as he did with the two disciples on the road to Emmaus, I could expound at great length on the eucharistic symbolism of the broken bread. As it stands, I am at a loss to explain the religious significance of broiled fish!

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Jesus proceeds to teach the disciples, opening their minds to understand the scriptures, with a particular focus on the fate of the Messiah. Jesus ends the class with a homework assignment: to proclaim repentance and forgiveness of sins in his name to all nations.

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Easter with the Magdalene

By the Rev. Darren Miner

Gospel Reading

The account of the Resurrection found in John’s Gospel holds a certain distinction. It is the only Gospel account that can be read at Easter in every year of our liturgical calendar. This Resurrection account is distinct in another way as well. It is by far the most vivid account of the events of that day, with details that distinguish it from the other three Gospels. Those details merit some attention. So, for the first part of this sermon, I would like to give a running commentary of the story that you just heard proclaimed, with a special focus on Mary Magdalene. Think of it as being like the director’s commentary you find on some DVDs.

Mary Magdalene goes to Jesus’ tomb before the sun has even risen and finds the stone rolled away from the mouth of the tomb. She jumps to the conclusion that grave robbers have stolen Jesus’ corpse. She panics. Without even looking in the tomb, she runs to Peter to report.

burnand-peter-john-running800x484Peter and the Beloved Disciple (who was with him at the time) race to the tomb. Like two children, they race. The Beloved Disciple gets there first, but then balks, cautiously peeking into the tomb but not entering. Peter, never one to give much thought before acting, barges right in. They find the tomb empty, except for the linen cloths that had been wrapped around the body of Jesus. We are told that at that moment the Beloved Disciple believes but does not understand. Evidently, Peter doesn’t know what to think. They both go home, one believing and one just perplexed.

At some point, Mary returns to the tomb. Perhaps she followed behind the two disciples during their footrace, unable to keep up with the boys. We find her standing desolate, weeping. She waits till Peter and the Beloved Disciple leave the scene before she dares to peek into the tomb herself. Instead of seeing the grave linens, she sees two angels sitting on the shelf where Jesus’ body had been laid. Everywhere else in the Bible, the appearance of angels causes fear and trembling. But Mary is so numb that the divine messengers don’t seem to make any impression on her at all. Speaking in unison, they ask why she weeps. (Although surely, they knew the answer.) She shares her fear that the body of her beloved teacher has been stolen.

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Alleluia! Christ is Risen. The Lord is risen indeed. Alleluia!

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Holy Week and Easter Services at Incarnation

Come and worship with us during Holy Week and Easter. Everyone is welcome at The Episcopal Church of the Incarnation

April 13 – Palm Sunday – Holy Communion: 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. (Bilingual – English & Chinese)

Our Palm Sunday service starts with the blessing of palm leaves and a procession of the assembled worshipers carrying the leaves into the church. The service then continues with the reading of the Passion of our Lord, followed by Holy Communion. Please join us as we start this important week.

April 15 – Tuesday in Holy Week – 10 a.m. Stations of the Cross & Holy Communion

The Stations of the Cross are a devotional depiction of the final hours of Christ. This service takes the worshiper through a spiritual pilgrimage of prayer by revisiting the chief scenes of Christ’s suffering and death.

April 17 – Maundy Thursday – 6 p.m. Agape Supper & Holy Communion

The Maundy Thursday service commemorates Jesus’ Last Supperwith a simple agape supper at 6 p.m., followed by Holy Communion. The service starts downstairs in our parish hall, and it concludes in the sanctuary with the stripping of the altar in preparation for Good Friday.

April 18 – Good Friday – 12 noon Good Friday Liturgy

The Good Friday service commemorates Jesus’ crucifixion and death in a moving, contemplative service.

April 20 – Easter Sunday – Holy Communion: 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. (Bilingual – English & Chinese)

Come celebrate Jesus’ resurrection at one of our Easter services. Our service includes special Easter music as well as our traditional “Flowering of the Cross.”

Holy Week Schedule

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April 2014 Issue of The Word – a quarterly newsletter from Incarnation

The April 2014 Edition of our quarterly newsletter, The Word, is now online! You can catch up on what’s been happening at Incarnation and what’s coming up! Read it here https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5BjXKwS7KTydkgtekl6UlN1NEk/edit?usp=sharing

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THE PROCLAMATION OF THE DATE OF EASTER ON EPIPHANY

Dear friends in Christ, the glory of the Lord has shone upon us, and shall ever be manifest among us, until the day of his return. Through the rhythms of times and seasons let us celebrate the mysteries of salvation. Let us recall the year’s culmination, the Easter Triduum of the Lord: his last supper, his crucifixion, his burial, and his rising celebrated between the evening of the seventeenth day of April and the evening of the nineteenth day of April.

Each Easter – as on each Sunday – the Holy Church makes present the great and saving deed by which Christ has for ever conquered sin and death. From Easter are reckoned all the days we keep holy. Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, will occur on the fifth day of March. The Ascension of the Lord will be commemorated on the twenty-ninth day of May. Pentecost, the joyful conclusion of the season of Easter, will be celebrated on the eighth day of June. And, this year the First Sunday of Advent will be on the thirtieth day of November.

Likewise the pilgrim Church proclaims the passover of Christ in the feasts of the holy Mother of God, in the feasts of the Apostles and Saints, and in the commemoration of the faithful departed.

To Jesus Christ, who was, who is, and who is to come, Lord of time and history, be endless praise, for ever and ever. Amen.

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